International Cruise Excursions Inc ICE logoEmployee turnover is one of the costliest hiring challenges today, which is why companies are focusing on more ways to recruit and retain talent—from investing in workplace benefits programs to making headline-worthy pay increases.

TweetMyJobs customer, International Cruise & Excursions, Inc. (ICE), is a B2B provider of travel-based rewards and loyalty programs. Their main recruiting challenge? Hiring high-demand telesales talent in the competitive call center capital of Scottsdale, AZ. (Download the full case study now.)

Social Recruiting in a Squeezed Labor Market

With the economy continuing to recover, call center representatives have more employment opportunities than they have in recent past. Job growth has pushed contact center turnovers to their highest rate since the recession—rising from 29% in 2009 to 46%1 in 2013.

ICE tweetmyjobs customer results

More and more competitors began launching social networking profiles, but we noticed how hardly any of them shared open jobs or even mentioned they were hiring. Their oversight was our opportunity: TweetMyJobs got our brand in front of more local talent in less time through social media. – Melody Nelson, Recruiting Specialist, ICE

Facing three main challenges—turnover, competition, and limited resources—ICE turned to TweetMyJobs to search for new channels and a new approach to hiring. Within the first few months, the company experienced stellar returns.

Social Recruiting Results

  • A 7x boost in applications within the first month of launching the TweetMyJobs platform and solution.
  • A 5x increase in clicks per job posting within the first three months.
  • Immediate employer brand exposure by giving employee referral and advocacy programs a social edge.

ICE case study twitter recruiting tweetmyjobs

 

Learn the specific social recruiting strategy that decreased the cost-of-turnover and boosted employer brand awareness. Download the case study now.

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3 laws of attraction hire in demand talent

Admit it: Hiring can seem a lot like dating, and vice versa. From both the candidate’s and employer’s experience, the similarities between the two processes are staggering:

The research and prep involved prior to the interview (the date), the chemistry tested to find a cultural fit (the match), and the pressure and expectation we feel when meeting each candidate in hopes that he or she is “the one”— can all be quite exhausting.

And this year, thanks to our economic upturn, employers are further challenged by a more competitive playing field. However, the similarities in the vetting process are preceded and supported by many of the same laws of attraction, laws which can be uniquely leveraged more effectively through social recruiting.

This Valentine’s Day, we turn to one of the bestselling books on the topic: The Art of Seduction, by Robert Greene. Taking three of the 24 laws he lists, we illustrate how each can change your strategy in attracting candidates, and how these laws applied in social recruiting can boost your employer brand influence.

recruit in demand talent create triangles

  1. Appear to be an object of desire—create triangles

  2. “People gather around those who have already attracted interest…Build a reputation that precedes you: If many have succumbed to your charms there must be a reason.” – Robert Greene

    Building and growing an employer brand today requires us to think differently. Before the dawn of social media, searching for the perfect job, or the perfect candidate, was conducted in a more private medium. Job ads, professional references, and headhunters all worked behind-the-scenes in one-to-one communication. The relationship was plotted with a direct line, unable to overtly show the triangles that exist within one’s network.

    Today, recruiters and job seekers alike are showing the strength of their professional networks online. References, testimonials, job postings, and more can be shared and re-shared on social networks and review sites. An active social presence not only implies an engaged and desirable employer brand, but both organic search and social platforms algorithms reward the most shared content with top ranking.

    How desirable is your employer brand? Are you and your employees proving that desirability online?

    law of attracting demand talent prove yourself

  3. Prove Yourself

  4. “Most people want to be seduced. If they resist your efforts, it is probably because you have not gone far enough to allay their doubts.” – Robert Greene

    The internet age may have made us more connected with individuals and brands alike, but it has also raised a healthy level of skepticism of online information. This is where wellness programs can really help your employer brand.

    Employees and job seekers today are putting more weight on wellness, benefits, and company perks than ever before. Investing in these programs shows care for your employees and helps prove your generosity as an employer. These programs also generate great content for sharing online. Take and post pictures of your latest company volunteer event. Apply for Best Places to Work awards and share accolades on social sites throughout the year.

    This content helps candidates picture themselves in an ideal work environment—an environment which employers can craft and promote more effectively in the age of social and visual media.

    how to recruit demand talent pay attention detail

  5. Pay attention to detail

  6. “Lofty words of love and grand gestures can be suspicious: Why are you trying so hard to please? The details of a seduction—the subtle gestures, the offhand things you do—are often more charming and revealing.” – Robert Greene

    The worst thing for a top candidate to know is that they ARE your top candidate. Showing interest without being too eager is a careful balance.

    The trick is to be specific and curious. Know your candidate persona so well that applicants will be impressed by your grasp of the intricacies of their profession. This attention to detail is important since top candidates usually interview with more potential employers than the average candidate. The goal is to forge a memorable and enjoyable candidate experience from the start.

    And the start is quite important. Like for couples, the story of how two people meet is a powerful one, usually setting the tone for the entire relationship. Social media allows us to do just that—find where talent congregates online and create possibilities for a great first impression.

    Where do your candidates engage online? What are the main topics of discussion? Are you and your brand present?


Expansion, Turnover, and Fierce Competition: How Social Recruiting Helps Companies Meet the Toughest Hiring Demands

Growth Turnover Competition Webinar
Thursday, February 26, 2015
11:00-12:00 AM PT / 2:00-3:00 PM ET

Join Elizabeth Jacoby, Recruiting Manager at Bar Louie, and industry veteran Mira Greenland as they discuss the social recruiting strategies and tactics you will when facing today’s tough hiring climate.

Sign up today to discover how to:
• How fast-growing Bar Louie quickly found culture-fit hires using targeted social campaigns.
• How social recruiting can help manage high turnover by increasing the flow of quality candidates and effectively raising employee retention.
• How to build and grow strong employer brand awareness by sharing your unique company culture through social marketing.
• And much more!

Register Now.

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Workplace Flexibility

We released new data today with WorkplaceTrends.com on workplace flexibility and work-life balance in a study entitled the “2015 Workplace Flexibility Study.” We surveyed over 1,000 professionals (both employed and unemployed) as well as 116 HR leaders to understand their views on workplace flexibility.

Interestingly, 67% of HR professionals think that their employees have a balanced work-life, yet almost half (45%) of employees feel that they don’t have enough time each week for their personal activities. While that disconnect exists, HR leaders are certainly aware of the benefits of workplace flexibility in their recruitment and retention efforts:

  • 7 out of 10 HR leaders surveyed use workplace flexibility programs as a recruiting tool.
  • 87% of HR leaders believe that workplace flexibility programs lead to employee satisfaction.

Employers are clearly seeing benefits from their flexibility programs. In addition to employee satisfaction and recruitment branding, 71% of HR leaders mentioned that workplace flexibility programs increased productivity while 65% mentioned that they help retain existing talent. 

Of course, there is always more that employers can do to strengthen their employment brand. Offering outplacement services and career transition assistance to employees is one place to start. 71% of job seekers reported that they were likely to choose a company that offered outplacement (career coaching and transition services for laid-off employees) over a company that did not if all else (salary, role, etc.) was equal. As a benefit, outplacement assistance was more important to potential employees than health and wellness benefits, community volunteer initiatives, tuition assistance, or culture change initiatives such as team building.

As technology continues to blur the line between ‘personal time’ and ‘work time,’ it’s clear that organizations that encourage workplace flexibility and create an honest, open dialogue with their potential job candidates as well as their existing employees will succeed. What is success? A strong employment brand for potential job candidates and happy, retained employees.

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We are very proud to announce that TweetMyJobs has been named a finalist in the ninth annual Stevie® Awards for Sales & Customer Service in two categories:

  1. Customer Service Department of the Year – Computer Software
  2. Front-Line Customer Service Team of the Year – Technology Industry

Customer service is the cornerstone of CareerArc’s culture. TweetMyJobs Client Success Managers (CSMs) participate in the organization’s technology product design process to provide feedback and help create the tools that their customers need and want.

“Recognition from the Stevie Awards is a great validation of our customer-first philosophy,” said CareerArc CEO Robin D. Richards.

A recent customer satisfaction survey conducted in October 2014 revealed that TweetMyJobs CSMs scored an overall 90% satisfaction rating. 95% of respondents rated their CSM as either Very Professional or Extremely Professional. 98.4% of respondents said their CSMs were effective in addressing their questions and concerns.

Winners for both the two categories will be announced Feb 27, 2015 at the Stevie Awards gala banquet.

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The beginning of the year is a time full of hope, good and bad resolutions, and a touch of magic: In January, the top HR minds dust off the crystal ball, read between the lines of industry data and human capital trends, and attempt to predict our future.

In this post we test our own clairvoyance and list the top 3 predictions we think will impact social recruiting this year.

hr marketer hybrid tmjedu

  1. Social Recruiting Prediction #1: HR Pros who manage social recruiting will further define the emergence of the HR-Marketer Hybrid.

    A defined content strategy will prove vital to differentiating employer brand. (Highlight text to tweet.)

  2. These days HR is full of “good problems to have.” Economic recovery and growth are among the top reasons why recruiting talent has gotten a lot harder in just the past several months, and why we just wrapped a record holiday hiring season.

    Our return to pre-recession unemployment levels last year increased the supply of jobs, and as employees gained more choices for employment, employee turnover rose. Many in HR have observed the power shift from employer to employee, power which has only grown stronger thanks to the dawn of social media and employer review sites.

    Josh Bersin of Bersin by Deloitte writes:

    “Employers, once in a position of power, are no longer in control, thanks to tremendous transparency in the job market that is driven by dozens of online job networks. And if your company is not a great place to work, people find out fast…Today, the concepts of “employment brand” and “employee engagement” have merged: Employees communicate your brand externally every day, whether you like it or not.”

    As competition for talent stiffens, the way in which employers use social media will become more competitive, and thus more targeted and defined. Candidates will expect to see more than a job description distributed through your social channel, and will pay closer attention to the way you engage with potential talent, as well as the content you choose to deliver to stand out from the crowd of employers. Social recruiters will continue to push their marketing skills to new heights, bringing 2015 ever closer to the advent of a marketing-savvy HR pro—the HR-Marketer Hybrid.

    mobile tech wave

  3. Social Recruiting Prediction #2: As mobile tech innovation and adoption heat up in HR and recruitment, social recruiting will naturally become more integral to recruitment and employer brand marketing.

  4. As the balance of power tips towards the passively-searching employee and actively-searching job candidate, and the use of mobile devices continues to further surpass that of desktops, more employers will invest and innovate to reach candidates on mobile.

    The Business Intelligence Report released last September notes social is now the top internet activity, and, “60% or so of social media time is spent not on desktop computers but on smartphones and tablets.”

    Wise employer brands will focus on the mobile delivery of jobs and branded content, and social recruiting will be inherently tied to this rising trend as the majority of mobile device owners use their phone or tablet everyday to access social sites.

    According to ExactTarget’s 2014 Mobile Behavior Report:

    “Using smartphones and tablets to peruse social networking sites is common; 75% of consumers do this at least once a day on their phones, and 64% of tablet owners use a tablet to access social media at least once a day.”

    Lastly, Dr. John Sullivan wrote in ERE.:

    “The mobile platform should be the primary mechanism for communicating with prospects/candidates, spreading your employer brand messages, to view recruiting and job description videos, and to push relevant open jobs to applicant communities.”

    advantage hr tech

  5. Social Recruiting Prediction #3: More companies will adopt and depend on social recruiting due to the competitive hiring environment. Companies will deepen their reliance on HR Tech for big data and automation tools to help win quality talent at less cost.

  6. Perhaps the most perennial prediction of them all is the increased adoption and dependence on technology. SHRM, TLNT, and ERE all share this similar vision, and we can expect to see this prediction read in the tea leaves of years-to-come.

    But let’s face it, HR is an industry plagued by the necessity of paper trails—documenting applications, performance reviews, etc. from the application to offboarding. To stay ahead of the competition, HR pros need constant tech innovation to make these processes more accurate and efficient so they can focus on the real challenge: acquiring and retaining top talent in an increasingly competitive hiring climate.

Today, social recruiting remains an area of HR innovation where employers can still gain competitive branding advantages just by adopting it faster than other employers in their industry or locale. We’ve seen this happen time and time again. And we expect to see this happen more and more this year.

Tell us your 2015 HR and recruiting predictions on Twitter using the hashtag #TMJEdu. 

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Facebook and LinkedIn want to make it easier for your employees to collaborate at work, regardless of your corporate social media policy.

The two social networking giants have separately announced new enterprise products that attempt to replace the dreaded work email and challenge new and old workplace collaboration tools.

This week, select clients have begun to test Facebook’s new enterprise product, Facebook at Work, which gives organizations  private, intra-office versions of the Facebook platform with which to share content across work groups.

Don’t fear: Facebook and Facebook at Work worlds will not collide—profiles and networks are completely separate between the two platforms. However, Facebook at Work promises a nearly identical user experience to that of Facebook, which allows for a minimal learning curve when adopting the service as many are already familiar with Facebook’s overall look, feel, and functionality.

Facebook at Work

LinkedIn is launching two separate products, the first of which takes a version of InMail– LinkedIn’s private messaging system—and gives it to colleagues to communicate directly with one another even if they are not already connected on LinkedIn. Employees could also upload their phone and email information, and thus the service could act as a database for company contact info. The second product promotes and enhances content sharing within the organization, allowing individuals to share blog-like posts to specific work groups within the company.

The move marks the first time the two networks will be competing for the same territory and population—the enterprise workplace and the employees within that workplace. Although LinkedIn is seen as the professional social network, the platform is most widely used for recruiting, employer branding, and job searching—activities which do not typically involve current colleagues or employers. For Facebook, being the online home for more personal relationships, this move could prove to be a larger shift for the network—and if successful—a good first foothold into the world of enterprise software.

Workspace and workplace collaboration is a well-fought tech battlefield where post-email workplace collaboration tools, like Yammer, Slack, and Trello, have been challenging the more entrenched enterprise software providers like IBM. But if you have been patiently waiting for the swift death of “the work email,” don’t hold your breath: Steve Boese reported this week that “depressingly, email remains the most important technology at work.”

Nevertheless this news brings up interesting questions: Can workplace communication and collaboration change if we change the medium? Will it create for a more open, casual, and collaborative work environment? And is this a good thing? 

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3 Worst New Years Resolutions for Social Recruiters

by Tallulah on December 15, 2014

3 worst new years resolutions social recruiters

A New Year is filled with boundless hope and promise…until February rolls around and you’ve lost all hope by breaking every promise made on New Year’s Eve. Increase the likelihood of sticking to your resolution by making a good one worthy of your will power.

As you evaluate your personal and professional goals, we give you the top 3 misguided social recruiting resolutions you should omit or revise before midnight strikes on January 1st.

  1. Continue chasing just that one KPI = No. of Applicants

  2. Of course increasing the amount of applicants is a good goal to have—a goal which social recruiting has proven to help meet time and time again —but increased applications should not be your only marker of success. If it is, you may be limiting the impact of your social recruiting campaigns and likely overlooking some key benefits you could be attributing to your efforts.

    Remember that Social Media is NOT a job board. Requisitions posted on job boards and picked up by job aggregators do not live in the same dynamic, real-time environment as other social networks—like Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn—and they hardly ever reach the gaze of the passive job seeker. Enhanced employer branding, increased brand exposure, and enriched candidate engagement are among the many surprising benefits social recruiting can offer. But if you don’t track KPIs like engagement—number of likes, shares, retweets, comments, clicks on original or curated content, etc.—you will have a harder time proving these results.

    social media employer brand

    Sharing quality content is a key to increasing real engagement. FB posts and tweets that express the company culture, employer values, or even a healthy sense of humor, could help attract better culture-fit hires, driving higher candidate quality—rather than only quantity—into your candidate flow.

    Related: 3 Keys to a Results-Driven Social Recruiting Strategy

  3. Do everything on your own

  4. Self-reliance is a virtue, but there comes a point when it turns to vice. We know many talent acquisition professionals—because of lack of funds, staff, or executive buy-in—don’t have much choice but to lead a one-person army in establishing and executing a social recruitment strategy. So allow us to revise this resolution and offer alternative goals to shoot for:

    worst new year resolution do not do it all

    • Do more, but with good help (yes, this requires you to ask for help.)
    • Chances are your company’s marketing team handles corporate social media accounts on the same social networks you either plan to or already have established career-focused channels. As social recruiting continues to nudge HR pros into becoming and thinking more like marketers, a relationship with the marketing team will soon move from recommended to required.

      Start small: Ask the marketing team to feature one job post every 1-2 days on the company’s main FB page. See where content can overlap—does the marketing team share inspirational quotes or original images that you can also post or retweet on your feed? The key is to start with an initiative where everyone will likely gain more exposure and engagement so the partnership can be founded upon positive results.

    • Do less, but more effectively. Set yourself up for success by limiting your load and dialing up your focus. What’s key to prioritizing your efforts is clearly communicating the possible, realistic outcomes to yourself and anyone evaluating the program’s success or failure. This is not the time to overpromise. Setting expectations prevents you from overextending and becoming overwhelmed. For example, instead of managing multiple communities at once, start with growing one community at a time to really be able to gauge what types of job posts, content, and even optimal times of day that drive the most engagement on your page.  

     

    Related: Recruiting Just Got A Lot Harder: 5 New Reasons Why

  5. Commit to social recruiting…in Q2…or Q3…or maybe after a year…give or take…

  6. The worst kind of resolution is the one that doesn’t start on time. But like blogging in the early 2000’s or vlogging on YouTube in 2006, social recruiting will continue to favor early adopters. Companies first to adopt a social recruiting strategy in their market or region will gain a competitive advantage that will only wane as more players join everyday. This early advantage will expire once social recruiting moves from today’s innovation to tomorrow’s HR norm.

worst new year resolution does not start

 

Just as David Creelmen comments in his recent, opinionated post on TLNT:

The HR technology world moves quickly and last year’s hot new idea becomes this year’s commonplace feature. HR needs a technology road map and they need to update that road map every year. The road map isn’t necessarily the path you will end up following, however it keeps you aware of the terrain.

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Infographic: Holiday Hiring By The Numbers

by Yair on December 1, 2014

We’re underway. Black Friday. Cyber Monday. The holiday shopping season is here. And with the billions of dollars spent in store and online from savvy shoppers, employers need to make sure they keep the shelves stocked and online customer support stations manned. A few weeks ago we reported on the massive growth in holiday hiring by employers, and today, we came across this great infographic from Adecco which illustrates the significant impact of holiday hiring on the economy. Check out the mind-blowing scale of holiday hiring.

The importance of holiday hiring to large retail companies

Holiday Hiring by the Numbers

 

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Retailers and shippers are projecting to hire about a total of 800,000 in seasonal staff this winter for what is expected to be the strongest holiday shopping season in this millennium, thus far.  However, employers are finding it more difficult to fill these seasonal positions in 2014 than in recent years, and the dearth of applicants has prompted companies to explore new channels for hire. The Wall Street Journal caught the trend, reporting that companies are primarily flocking to one new destination to source more qualified candidates: social media.

WSJ social media holiday hires video

In a video interview on WSJ live, journalist Eric Morath was asked why it took so many retailers so long to utilize social media for recruitment:

Q. It’s interesting that they’re turning to social media out of necessity. You wonder, “Why didn’t they think of this before?”

Morath: Well these have traditionally been ways to essentially advertise to customers, reach out to people who want to buy your products, and for some companies…they are not necessarily advertising to people who are looking for low-wage retail jobs, but they realize, ‘Hey, if we open up our audience maybe that mom or dad that’s staying home with the kids might be willing to help us out during the holidays so why not reach out to our customers as employees?

Perhaps necessity is the greatest invention, as social recruiting has already given companies, like Beverages & More Inc., quick wins to celebrate—bringing us to the first reason WSJ cites social as the medium of choice for holiday hiring:

  1. Social Media Has Already Proven To Drive Quick Recruitment Results

  2. The article touts BevMo’s recent success with Twitter, noting that the company had 1,000 open seasonal requisitions to fill, and was at first reluctant about advertising jobs to its customers. However, after just a month of distributing jobs on social media, BevMo increased online applications by 66%.

    Here is one example of their job tweets:

    BevMo holidays open jobs tweet

    Spiking its online application volume just by adding social media into their mix of hiring channels gives us fantastic proof of social media as an effective source of hire; however, we would add that BevMo may have seen an even higher jump in online applications if they had followed just a few TweetMyJobs Twitter best practices—such as hashtag optimization, geo-tagging, and incorporating inline twitter images and twitter cards—all of which have shown to increase SEO and click through rates on Twitter.

    They’re ability to garner these numbers without tweet optimization techniques only open up the imagination to what conversion rates might still be possible if their tweets could reach even more potential candidates on Twitter.

    Related: 3 Signs You’re a Twitter Recruiting Ace

  3. Recruiting on Social Media Effectively Attracts Passive Candidates

  4. holiday hiring trends graph

    High staffing demand, but low-applicant turnout reveals a holiday labor market reacting to the continued economic upswing. As Morath explains, although national unemployment has dipped, the labor force participation rate—which includes everyone employed along with everyone who desired to be employed and is 16 years-old or above—is at a sluggish 62.7%, a number unseen since the late 1970’s. Retail employees of past holiday seasons may have since found full-time positions or experienced the boons of economic recovery, thus rendering the need for a seasonal job this year less urgent and less crucial.

    With so much potential human capital waiting in the wings, Morath argues:

    “Social media pushes broaden the pool of candidates by attracting workers who aren’t actively looking for jobs.”

    While traditional job boards are the venue for active job seekers and employers to meet with one common goal—securing a hire—social media has become the venue for brands to engage with followers and even turn these loyal customers into loyal employees.

    Related: Recruiting Just Got A Lot Harder: 5 New Reasons Why

  5. Holiday Hiring is a Sprint to the Finish. Social Media Moves at the Speed of the Season.

  6. Holiday hiring is tricky business: Employers have just about a month to fill thousands of requisitions. Usually starting after holiday sales forecasts are announced in early October, companies make a mad dash to be fully staffed by early November, just a few weeks before Black Friday.

    Ellen Davis, an executive who manages National Retail Federation’s Talent Acquisition Group, supports employers’ moves towards social media:

    “When you’re hiring 10,000 people in that short time, you can’t take out newspaper ads…Using existing channels to reach prospective hires is smart and economical.”

UPS is leveraging social media and other interactive platforms to fill 95,000 holiday jobs.

UPS—a TweetMyJobs client—is projecting to add a whopping 95,000 members to their team this season, almost doubling their last year’s count of only 50,000 hires. They advertise jobs on Twitter (@UPSJobs), and their Facebook page links directly to the Job Map powered by TweetMyJobs which visually captures the breadth of their current hiring demands.

UPS holiday jobs map

Are you using social media to hire this holiday season? Share your experiences and tips below or with us on Twitter @TweetMyJobs using the #TMJEdu hashtag.

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3 Keys to Social Recruiting Strategy

At the end of each year, we all naturally take stock of the past and begin planning for a better future. For any HR professional, this process isn’t easy as it requires an honest look at a variety of efforts, and the courage to either commit to or pivot from a plan.

The HCI webcast and panel discussion TweetMyJobs recently hosted focused on how to strategically set goals, plan, and execute a social recruitment program. Watch the full recording of the webcast now.

In it our VP of Sales Mira Greenland (@miragreenland) and three colleagues and HR practitioners bravely revisit the past year, laying out their social recruiting efforts on the table. Each practitioner discussed their overall goals, the planning and execution, and their pitfalls and successes.

While the webcast goes through each case in more depth, here are the 3 keys to crafting a results-driven social recruiting strategy:

Start Strong

  1. Start strong. Assess your resources and set realistic goals. Early wins build a natural momentum towards success.

  2. You may be starting your social recruiting program from scratch—no social accounts set, no dedicated team, etc. But this doesn’t mean you lack the resources to break ground.

    Audra Knight (@media2knight) is the Social Media Recruiting Coordinator at UMASS Memorial Medical Center, the largest employer in central Massachusetts. With an average 600+ open requisitions per month, Audra managed to secure executive buy-in to launch a social recruiting effort; however, without a team to rely on, she alone planned and executed the entire program.

    Wisely, Audra started small establishing a Facebook careers page, testing conversions and engagement on content and job posts. Watch the webinar to learn the techniques she utilized to boost content posts. Now equipped with the past year’s results, she plans to reach out to the marketing department to collaborate on content creation such as adding recruitment related posts on the main UMASS FB page.

    Related: 7 Ways to Really Source on Facebook Using Social Media

    Don't get lost

  3. Consider your social media platforms ofchoice. Work with what you’ve got, but know where you’ve got to be.

  4. Chrissy Glover (@chrissyglo) is the Employer Brand Marketing Manager at Opower, a company that competes in the hi-tech Silicon Valley market for top talent. Opower already had branded pages set up on three social networks: LinkedIn, Glassdoor, and Twitter. Although these sites were established, they had minimal activity and community engagement.

    Although Chrissy knew adding a Facebook careers page would be ideal, she decided to first work with the existing platforms before splintering her attention and managing a new community altogether.

    She focused her energy on boosting engagement and discusses her exact tactics in the webcast which resulted to a doubling in new followers per month on Glassdoor.

    Related: 3 Qualities of Highly Successful Social Recruiters

    Prepare, but don't fear

  5. Be prepared, but don’t be afraid. You can limit social media risks, but anticipating what could happen can ultimately harm your momentum and detract from the overall goal.

  6. One of my favorite takeaways came from Aetna University Relations Recruiter, Lindsay Parks (@Lparks2387), who was instrumental in crafting the Aetna Social Media Playbook aimed at mitigating the risks of social media participation for the a Fortune 100 company and its customers.

    The 90-page plan outlines an escalation process to ensure that whoever manages social media was prepared to handle any issues that arise. The document took a year to complete.

    Related: Top 3 Fears of Social Recruiting, Dispelled

    When asked to share any pitfalls she could help us avoid when drafting our own social recruiting playbook, she answered ironically, but also very truthfully:

    “You don’t know what you don’t know.”

    She referred to how she and her team attempted to map out an escalation process, brainstorming all the possible risks and crisis situations that could occur. They realized that imagining all possible outcomes was not only impossible but it impacted their focus on the main goals—recruitment, engagement, employer branding, etc.

These three practitioners are blazing the new trails within their organizations, making way for social recruiting programs to take root and thrive. Although their experiences vary greatly, the similarities of each case shed light on the essential ingredients that push social hiring programs to success.

What are your keys to a results-driven social recruiting strategy? Share them below or tweet us at @TweetMyJobs, and use #TMJEdu to share your thoughts with our community.

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